One-Sentence Reviews: My February & March Reads

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This morning I started my first book of spring: The Lola Quartet by Emily St. John Mandel. It’s my 17th book so far this year, as I steadily make progress toward reading 55 works of fiction and nonfiction—and maybe I’ll even try to throw in some poetry or graphic novels to keep things diverse. In January I posted mini reviews of my first five books of the year, and now seemed like a good time to reflect on the rest of my winter reading while gearing up for warmer weather and hopefully many days sitting on my porch with a good story in hand.

Worth It…

The Comet Seekers by Helen Sedgwick: I love that this glittering, stylized novel doesn’t shy away from tough and sometimes taboo topics, all while successfully unraveling the gordian knot linking its two suffering protagonists.

The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden: When old beliefs are denounced in favor of a new religion, only a young gifted girl can see the terror coming to her town; this spellbinding tale of magic, folklore, and history is a new kind of fairytale that can easily hold its own among the classics.

In a Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware: This thrilling mystery about a bachelorette party gone wrong is so compelling that I finished it in only one day, unable to rest until I had found out just what it was the narrator couldn’t remember about the murder that had taken place.

Don’t Bother…

The Last Painting of Sara de Vos by Dominic Smith:  This novel—which traces the history of a painting and its painter, and its forged counterpart and its painter—has too many subplots and could have been told in half the number of words.

The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George: The only good thing about this thinly plotted novel is its original premise: a floating bookshop that doles out books like medicine (too bad the book quickly leaves that idea behind and heads instead into cliche and oft-charted waters).

The Sparrow Sisters by Ellen Herrick: I had high hopes for this book, billed as similar to the writings of Sarah Addison Allen (one of my favorite authors!) and Alice Hoffman, but its unrefined characters and muddled plot fail to generate even a shred of magic.

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5 thoughts on “One-Sentence Reviews: My February & March Reads

  1. You have been reading up a storm, Chris! I admire your talent for writing one-sentence book reviews. Soon we will both be reading on our porches as we gaze over our gardens. 🙂

    I’ve been walking through the garden every day to see what is popping up. This week, miniature Irises and Crocuses are in full bloom. Have you seen any signs of Spring in your garden yet? Sending sunshine! ♡

    • Thanks for stopping by, Dawn! I have been trying to read a lot this year, though I had to take a week off last week because I had pink eye in both eyes!! So now I’m finally getting back to reading and blogging and catching up on things. That’s great that your garden is blooming. Until recently mine has been buried in snow haha. But in our front yard we do have a few tulip leaves popping out of the ground. I hope they survive and keep growing!! And I hope all is well with you and that you have a wonderful week ❤

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